Anthony Vincent of 10 Second Songs releases Metallica’s “Enter Sandman” in 20 styles

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Anthony Vincent of Ten Second Songs has released his newest video, Metallica’s “Enter Sandman” in 20 Styles. His newest auditory kaleidascope rendors the metal classic in the style of such diverse bands as Owl City, John Denver and The Doors as well as exploring genres as varied as lo fi hip hop, Yodeling, and Synthwave.
” I want to start showcasing more metal and rock songs in non metal styles to show non metal listeners that metal and rock songs are just as good if not better than what they listen to. Or I just want to hear bad things sung in nice ways. Ok, a little bit of both. ” – Anthony Vincent

 

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A massive crowd just lifted a fan out of his wheelchair to crowdsurf at a Metallica show

Metallica’s “Worldwired” headlining tour may be coming to a close, but as successful as the tour has been (with massive crowds coming out every single night), I doubt anything tops what just happened when the tour stopped in Vancouver last night. Case in point, the person in a wheelchair that was assisted by fellow metalheads to be able to crowdsurf.

Metal has a way of uniting fans of all races and creeds, and I don’t think there’s anything better than the pics below. Like Avenged Sevenfold tweeted, “Don’t ever let anyone or anything hold you back.”

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Horror, Heavy Metal, and Political Correctness: An Interview with Cody Rapp (AKA: Biscutbuu69)

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For one living in the United States, it’s hard to imagine a social climate in which the topics of political correctness and social justice are not brought to the forefront of everyday news, and certainly these topics are newsworthy – both in regards to those who are fighting for education and improvement of said topics as well as those who are trying to tear them down.

In America, these topics are seen with increasing prevalence in relation to media, notably movies and film, which have, since their modern inception, been subject to strict scrutiny. Is there a line in being politically correct? Is it necessary to be so at all, or is it just letting the over-sensitive “social justice warriors” win, and therefore diminish the quality or the art in question?

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