TNF Feature: Alex Sepassi (Silver Relics) discusses the enduring influence of Depeche Mode

Fresh off the release of their new album Generic., New York rock newcomers Silver Relics are trying to make a name for themselves in a crowded music scene. However, the album title is certainly one that does not actually fit the bill for the duo, who formed just a couple years ago. Drawing lots of influence from past eras of music as well as the likes of The Cure and Depeche Mode, it’s likely that Silver Relics will make their way into your playlists.

Even better? Silver Relics’ Alex Sepassi, one half of the duo, has stopped by to discuss the enduring influence of Depeche Mode – specifically their Music For The Masses and Violator records. Read the whole thing below, and stream their entire new record as well.

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Looking Through The Glass: Revisiting Stone Sour’s 2006 breakthrough sophomore record, “Come What[ever] May”

Side projects are a difficult thing to analyze indeed, both from a fan perspective as well as a critical one. Traditionally, the reasons for a side project are fairly linear – they tend to place emphasis on different aspects of the musician that won’t fit the main band(s), or a vehicle to explore and mess around with new styles and genres of music. Some of the biggest bands in history started off as side projects – notables ones include Gorillaz (Blur, Jamie Hewlett), Dashboard Confessional (Chris Carrabba, originally in Further Seems Forever), and of course, the ubiquitous solo album (Mike Shinoda, KISS, and entirely too many other musicians). While not all of these projects are commercially or critically successful, that’s not the point. If a side project explores new avenues of music, that always makes a musician more adept at their craft. Perhaps, the term “success” is actually relative in this market, but I digress.

Anyhow, Stone Sour – the side project of Corey Taylor of Slipknot, occupies a unique space in the rock and metal scenes. After all, Stone Sour was Taylor (and former member Jim Root’s) main project before Slipknot were signed in the late 90’s. In 2002, the band unleashed their self-titled debut album, which earned them Grammy nominations for “Get Inside” and “Inhale”, and while that record was a really solid start, it’s the 2006 follow-up Come What[ever] May that cemented Stone Sour as an act all their own.

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Michigan pop-punk act Last Night Saved My Life premieres new album, “Cherry” (Exclusive Stream)

Full of pop-punk and alternative influences, Last Night Saved My Life have been gearing up for the Friday release of their debut full-length, Cherry. A slickly-produced yet captivating set of songs, the band’s new album also features State Champs’ Derek DiScanio on lead single, “Waterfall” – unsurprisingly being one of the standout songs on the new record.

Today, we’re excited to team up with the band to bring you a pre-release album stream for the new record, which drops at midnight. Fans of slick pop-punk and catchy melodies need to pay attention to what Last Night Saved My Life are doing. Stream the whole thing below!

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Religious Infamy: In 1998, Embodyment pioneered the deathcore genre with “Embrace The Eternal”

Ahhhhh, deathcore. It’s one of the most despised genres of music out there, and despite the fact that there are plenty of mediocre bands of the genre, there are also plenty of gems. Dismissing the genre entirely would be a mistake, and that goes double for many of the bands who pioneered the genre. After all, metalcore pioneers 18 Visions’ earlier albums were one small step away from the genre, too.

In 1998, though, the genre didn’t really exist. Sure, death metal legends Suffocation (as well as bands like Pyrexia) played a huge part in pioneering the genre in the early 90’s, and nearly every deathcore band cites early Obituary material as influences, but one of the genre’s best-kept secrets is a little record by a band called Embodyment. Interestingly, they were an unapologetically Christian band, but that doesn’t take anything away from a sound they helped to pioneer in 1998 on their debut record. That record, Embrace The Eternal, is a must-listen if you haven’t heard it before.

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