Attention, bands: Drop the ego, lose the arrogance, and create community instead.

Relevant. (Photo credit: Classic FM)

Quite often, the bands and musicians who reach relative “success” (whatever you want to define it as) are the ones who try to use their earned platform for good. Whether it’s by drawing attention to other up and coming musicians, standing up for social causes, or (positive) interactions with their fans, there are plenty of ways that this can happen. Generally speaking, it’s good to be a good and helpful person.

On the flip side of this, however, is musicians that do the complete opposite. Whether it’s spitting on fans, insulting them on social media because they don’t love your mediocre new album, or God forbid, taking advantage of their fans in any way, there are sadly plenty of artists that do these things. Fame and attention have the negative side effect of potentially turning the quietest and most ambitious people into raging egotists.

What can artists do to improve that, then? Sometimes it’s as easy as supporting other artists trying to make a name for themselves, and sometimes it’s a bit more substantial. It’s easier to mention what NOT to do, though.

Drop the rockstar behavior on stage. Focus on being a better performer instead. If you fuck up, take some responsibility for it. That is, after all, what adults do – right? Getting into Twitter wars with people you don’t like also falls under this ridiculous umbrella.

Having an Internet persona is one thing, but saying “I fuckin hate most bands” when you’re about to go on a headlining tour is just straight up irresponsible. After all, if you’re willing to make a bold claim that most bands aren’t really “cool”, critics can just as easily say the same about you. Especially when there’s bands bigger than yours that are actually using their stature for good. It says a lot about your band if you’re not well-liked. To quote others who have said the same things in the past – “Trashing other bands in your scene isn’t hurting their rep. It’s hurting yours.”

To reiterate a previous point, bands like Knocked Loose and Every Time I Die (among others) are worth emulating. Whether you enjoy their music or not, you really have to hand it to them for never forgetting where they came from – many of the bands that they invite on their headlining tours have gone on to do big things. And at the end of the day, music is freedom – Alison Wonderland said it best.

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